Robert Temple Booksellers:

Abbreviations,   References,  and  Conventions used in the Catalogue

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Abbreviations

(The following list excludes most abbreviations relating to book and paper sizes, for which see heading `BOOKS' in the Conventions section below.)










a.e.g. .. all edges gilt
blank .. blank leaf
edn. .... edition
fo. ........folio
Lge. .... Large
ll. ........ leaves
Med. ......... Medium
N.D. .......... No Date

p. ............... page
pp. ............ pages
sm. ........... small
t.e.g. .... top-edges gilt
uncut. .. edges not trimmed flush
unopened .. edges still joined at folds
Vol(s). .. Volume(s)

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References

(The following list of references excludes single-author bibliographies which are readily identifiable from library listings of the particular authors concerned. Otherwise we have tried to make it complete.)




















 
 
 

  • Allibone....................A Critical Dictionary of English Literature, and British and American Authors.... 3 Vols., Philadelphia, Childs & Peterson; J.B. Lippincott & Co., 1859-71; and Supplement, 2 Vols., J.B. Lippincott & Co., 1891

  • Baker.......................A Descriptive Guide to The Best Fiction, British and American. Swan Sonnenschein and Co., Lim., 1903; and 3rd edn., N.Y., The Macmillan Company, 1932

  • Ball..........................Victorian Publishers' Bindings. The Library Association, 1985

  • Blanck.....................Bibliography of American Literature. 9 Vols., New Haven, Yale University Press, 1959-1991

  • BLC........................British Library Catalogue

  • Block......................The English Novel, 1740-1850. 2nd edn., Dawsons, 1961

  • Boyle......................An Index to the Annuals 1820-1850. Worcester, Andrew Boyle (?Booksellers) Ltd., 1967

  • Carter.....................Binding Variants; More Binding Variants. Constable, 1932; 1938

  • CBEL.....................Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. C.U.P., 1940

  • Chapman............... Cancels. Constable & Co. Ltd., 1930

  • Clute & Nicholls.....The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Orbit, 1993

  • Connolly.................The Modern Movement: One hundred key books from England, France and America 1880-1950. André Deutsch/Hamish Hamilton, 1965

  • Currey....................Science Fiction and Fantasy Authors: A Biblioggraphy of First Printings of Their Fiction and Selected Nonfiction. G.K. Hall & Co, Boston, Mass., 1979

  • De Waal.................World Bibliography of Sherlock Holmes. Bramhall House, N.Y., 1974

  • Fabes & Foyle........Modern First Editions: Points and Values. 2nd Series, W. & G. Foyle Ltd., 1931

  • Faxon.....................Literary Annuals and Giftbooks: A Bibliography, 1823-1903. Private Libraries Association, 1973

  • Hubin......................The Bibliography of Crime Fiction, 1749-1975. University of California, San Diego, 1979

  • Halkett & Laing.......Dictionary of Anonymous and Pseudonymous English Literature, 7 Vols., including Supplement. Oliver & Boyd, 1934-51

  • Locke......................A Spectrum of Fantasy. 2 Vols., Ferret, 1980-94

  • Lofts & Adley..........The Men behind Boys Fiction. Howard Baker, 1970

  • McBurney................A Check List of English Prose Fiction 1700-1739. Harvard U.P., Cambridge, Mass., 1960

  • McLean...................Victorian Publishers' Book-bindings in Paper. Gordon Fraser, 1983

  • Miles.......................The Poets & the Poetry of the Century. 10 Vols., Hutchinson, N.D. [?1889-92]

  • Nelson.....................According to context: The Early Nineties - A View from the Bodley Head. Harvard U.P., 1971; Elkin Mathews. U. of Wisconsin Press, 1989

  • Nield.......................A Guide to the Best Historical Novels and Tales, 4th edn. Elkin Mathews, 1911; 5th edn. Elkin Mathews & Marrot, 1929

  • NUC......................National Union Catalogue

  • Ramsden.................London Book Binders 1780-1840; Book Binders of the United Kingdom (Outside London) 1780-1840. 2 Vols., Batsford, 1956; 1954

  • Reilly.......................Late Victorian Poetry. Mansell, 1994

  • Rothschild................The Rothschild Library, 2 Vols. C.U.P., 1954

  • Sadleir.....................XIX Century Fiction, 2 Vols. 1951

  • Sadleir, Excursions...Excursions in Victorian Bibliography. Constable, 1922

  • Sawyer & Darton.....English Books 1475-1900. 2 Vols., Sawyer, 1927

  • Schwartz..................1100 Obscure Points. The Ulysses Bookshop, 1931

  • Shillingsburg.............The Printing, Proof-reading, and Publishing of Thackeray's Vanity Fair. In Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia, Vol.34, 1981

  • STC.........................Pollard & Redgrave: A Short Title Catalogue of Books Printed in England, Scotland, & Ireland...1475-1640. 2 Vols., 2nd edn., The Bibliographical Society, 1981-76

  • Summers..................A Gothic Bibliography. Fortune Press, N.D.

  • White.......................English Illustration: `The Sixties': 1855 - 1870. Constable, 1897

  • Wolff........................Nineteenth-century Fiction. 5 Vols., Garland Publishing, Inc., N.Y., 1981-6

  • Wright......................American Fiction 1774-1850. 2nd edn. Id., 1851-1875. 2nd edn. Id., 1876-1900. 3 Vols., 1969, 1965, 1966, San Marino, Ca., The Huntington Library

     In our notes reference is occasionally made to our own past catalogues. These will be found in the British Library under the General Catalogue shelf-mark `SC.TEMPLE (2)'.

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  • Conventions used in describing books in the Catalogue


    THE FOLLOWING CONVENTIONS were originally adopted before the advent of the hard disk, as a means of compressing as much information about a book as possible within the smallest possible space. They are given here as originally devised, but with the caveat that some variation has been introduced, particularly in respect of greater fullness in the transcription of title-pages. Further, since a large catalogue even of current stock-holdings must necessarily have been created over a lengthy period of time, some inadvertent variation, likewise, may have occurred. In the main, however, the following rules apply:

    AUTHOR'S NAMES are normally given in headings in the form in which they appear upon the title-page, the surname being shown in capitals as the lead word of the heading, and titles, initials, fore-names, and qualifications, if shown on the title-page, following it in parentheses. These are generally given exactly as they there appear, but in cases where the title-page displays a plethora of honours or an extended curriculum vitae, this, or most of it, may be omitted, only that part being reproduced which appears to us to be of particular interest in the context, or to have value for other reasons, as for instance in the dating of an otherwise undated book. Added information, such as a pseudonymous author's real name, or the expansion of initials, is enclosed within square brackets, in the format: `BROWN (R. [i.e., John Smith])' or `SMITH (J[ohn]. A[lbert].)'. An anonymous book by a known author is listed under that author's name, the whole of the name in that case being enclosed within square brackets. Similarly, where an author has published under a name, pseudonymous or otherwise, that he does not normally use, the book is listed under the author's usual name, that name in the heading being included within square brackets, and the actual by-line being given in the transcription of the title-page at the point where it appears.

    TITLE PAGES, apart from imprints, are transcribed in full, with the following exceptions: the author's name, if given in the main heading; listings of other works by the same author; epigraphs; the place of publication, if London; and copyright information, such as the words `All rights reserved'. Any of this information MAY be given, in any degree of detail, where it has been thought desirable for any reason to do so, but the ABSENCE of it in our description should not be taken to imply its absence from the title page concerned. Volume numbers are only transcribed where the number of volumes is not stated on the title-page, or where there are other differences in wording, punctuation, or capitalisation as between volumes, and in this latter case the variant readings are given in square brackets as they occur, after the reading present in the first volume. An empty square bracket, in this context, indicates the absence of a recorded feature from a sequent title-page. Lines printed entirely in capitals are treated as though printed in lower case, except that words normally requiring an initial capital, such as proper nouns, or the lead words of sentences, are shown as having that capital in our transcription. Lines in which some words are printed in capitals and some in lower case are shown as though the former were printed in upper and lower case unless there is some reason for shewing them wholly in capitals. Words printed in large and small capitals are treated as though printed in upper and lower case, and words printed in upper and lower case are so shown in our transcription. IN ADDITION, every word beginning a new line is given by us an initial capital, thus in general enabling the lineation of our title page to be checked against that of another copy of the book. Punctuation is, where possible, accurately reproduced, but since lineation and variations in type style are frequently used on title-pages as a replacement for punctuation, it has often been necessary to add, for the sake of clarity, a comma, semi-colon, colon, or full-stop, and this has normally been done silently, as it would merely have tended to confusion, within the context of a Catalogue, to have enclosed such added punctuation marks within square brackets. Exceptions to this occur only where the absence of a punctuation mark is thought to constitute a possible issue point, when square brackets are used. The word `sic' enclosed within square brackets indicates that an apparent error or omission is not ours, but a transcription of the original. A diagonal dash enclosed within square brackets indicates text set in double column.

    IN THE TRANSCRIPTION OF PUBLISHER'S IMPRINTS AND ADDRESSES, punctuation and capitalisation follows as far as possible the rules given above except that a comma is shown as present at the end of every line where no other mark of punctuation, with the exception of a full stop denoting a contraction, is found. A contraction at the end of a line is shown as having a full stop followed by a comma where a full stop is present in the original. If no full stop is present in the original, then none is shown. A full stop at the end of an imprint, preceding a date, is not shown unless the date is given on the same line, and in this case the punctuation follows that of the original. In all other cases the last word given prior to the date is followed by a comma, to indicate the line end. Publishers' addresses, and listings of subsidiary publishers are normally omitted, but may be shown where they are thought to be of interest. Addresses are rarely given unless they are given in full on the title-page, or unless the full address may be supplied from elsewhere in the volume, as for example an integral advertisement leaf. Parts of an address or other information so supplied is enclosed in square brackets. The words `No place', `No date' (contracted as `N.D.'), `No publisher', `No printer' are not enclosed in square brackets since it is obvious that they do not appear on the book.

    DATES may be taken to appear either on the recto or the verso of the title leaf if they are given without comment and are not enclosed within square brackets. A date that appears on any other integral leaf, and has been placed there by the publisher not the author, is likewise not enclosed within square brackets, but it is preceded by a comment so enclosed, which gives its origin, as: `[On front cover:] 1892.' If the month of publication is given as well as the date, and the date is present on both the recto and verso of the title-leaf, in the former instance without a record of the month, the month is shown enclosed in square brackets. Years that are given within square brackets have not been placed on the book at all by the publisher, but are supplied from some other source. Those in Roman numerals are given as though they appear in Arabic ones, but dates are otherwise transcribed as they appear. Where the date on a book is known to be false the correct date is given in square brackets following the false one, as: `1892 [i.e., December 1891].' To avoid possible confusions that might arise from our use of square brackets as detailed here, where square brackets actually appear on a title-page they are altered silently to parentheses: `( )'.

    BOOKS are described by reference to the make-up of a supposed `standard book', which is assumed to be a single volume, folded and finished to crown 8vo format, in the original publisher's binding, with hard covers somewhat larger than the leaves, a hollow back, lettered across, all edges trimmed but plain, white non-integral end-papers, and a half-title leaf. Variations from this standard make-up, such as a difference in size, the possession of soft covers, or an applied back, the presence of integral or non-integral advertisements, illustrations, initial or terminal blanks, or the absence of a half-title, are noted in the general description of each volume. Since it is usually impossible with books printed in the nineteenth or twentieth centuries to tell the original sheet size from an examination of the published volume, books are described by reference to the finished size. The main sizes referred to are, from small to large: Pott; Foolscap (contracted `F'cap.'); Post; Globe, Crown (`Cr.'); Large post (`Lge.post'); Demy; Medium (`Med.'); Royal (`Roy.'); Super royal (`Super roy.'); Imperial (`Imp.'); Elephant. Each may be folio (fo.), quarto (`4to'), octavo (`8vo'), duodecimo (`12mo'), sexto-decimo (`16mo'), duo-tricesimo (`32mo'), double-duo-tricesimo (`64mo'), etc., according as the full sheet is folded in two, four, eight, twelve, etc. Sheets may be double the regular sizes, or half or quarter sheets may be used. Thus `double cr.16mo' designates a book gathered in sixteens but finished to cr.8vo size; whilst `cr.8vo in half sheets' designates a book gathered in fours but finished to cr.8vo size. For the sake of simplicity, foreign books are described in terms of English sizes.

    ADVERTISEMENT LEAVES occurring at any point within a book after the front free end-paper and before the last leaf of text are integral unless the contrary is stated. The status of advertisement leaves occurring elsewhere in a volume is always noted. Advertisements are reckoned as integral if they either carry signatures that are sequential with those of the text, or appear to have been printed conjugate with text leaves. Advertisements that are not so vouched for, but appear to be integral because they are printed on the same paper as the rest of the book are described non-committally as `text-paper advertisements'. The word `advertisement', where not further qualified, means an advertisement pertaining to the publisher of the book, or to other of the same author's works. Outside of this definition, advertisements that relate to other publisher's or to booksellers are described as `trade advertisements'. Those not relating to publishing or bookselling are described as `commercial advertisements'.

    WITHIN DESCRIPTIONS and in the NOTES FOLLOWING THE PRICE capital letters are used for such words as Introduction, Dedication, Note, Catalogue, etc., where such words are used as headings in the book: thus, a `Catalogue' describes itself as such; a `catalogue' may call itself a `List' or perhaps nothing at all.


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